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DRC Department of Curiosities

In this segment of Denton Dammit, we take a look at some of the odder finds we've stumbled across in the Denton Record-Chronicle building. We're sorting through the items accumulated over decades of newspaper-making in preparation for a move across town later this year.

— Curator Mariel Tam-Ray

Photos by Jeff Woo/DRC

<p><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">This solid metal trolley was once used to help move massive rolls of newsprint for the press that used to print the <i>DRC</i>. Former photographer David Minton uncovered this find, but watch your toes -- it weighs several hundred pounds.</span></p>

This solid metal trolley was once used to help move massive rolls of newsprint for the press that used to print the DRC. Former photographer David Minton uncovered this find, but watch your toes -- it weighs several hundred pounds.

<p><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">Anybody heading up to Spavinaw, Oklahoma, soon? This wooden nickel is "Good for One Draft Beer" at Taco's Tavern there. Some ex-staffer here had it stashed away in a desk drawer for a rainy day -- or a dry day.</span></p>

Anybody heading up to Spavinaw, Oklahoma, soon? This wooden nickel is "Good for One Draft Beer" at Taco's Tavern there. Some ex-staffer here had it stashed away in a desk drawer for a rainy day -- or a dry day.

<p><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">Two cases of 8-track tapes, left behind as a possible donation to Bucks Burnett's Eight Track Museum, temporarily installed next door in 2010 during 35 Denton (when the fest was known as NX35 Music Conferette). Selections include Charley Pride's <i>Burgers and Fries/When I Stop Leaving (I'll Be Gone)</i>, the soundtracks to <i>Paint Your Wagon</i> and <i>South Pacific</i>, a little Beethoven and two copies of <i>Glass Houses</i> by Billy Joel. One initially promising find was <i>The Best of Willie Nelson, Vol. 1</i>, which turned out to be "Simulated Sounds by the Authenticities," as auspicious a name as you'll ever find for a sound-alike band.</span><br></p><p></p>

Two cases of 8-track tapes, left behind as a possible donation to Bucks Burnett's Eight Track Museum, temporarily installed next door in 2010 during 35 Denton (when the fest was known as NX35 Music Conferette). Selections include Charley Pride's Burgers and Fries/When I Stop Leaving (I'll Be Gone), the soundtracks to Paint Your Wagon and South Pacific, a little Beethoven and two copies of Glass Houses by Billy Joel. One initially promising find was The Best of Willie Nelson, Vol. 1, which turned out to be "Simulated Sounds by the Authenticities," as auspicious a name as you'll ever find for a sound-alike band.

<p><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">What&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">can we say about this photo of a man and a monkey? Not much, because we don't know who they are or where it came from. The photo came from the desk of former region editor Les Cockrell, and come to think of it, Les did sport a mustache ...</span><br></p><p></p>

What can we say about this photo of a man and a monkey? Not much, because we don't know who they are or where it came from. The photo came from the desk of former region editor Les Cockrell, and come to think of it, Les did sport a mustache ...

<p><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">You're familiar with regular 12-inch LPs, 7-inch 45s and the hipsters' beloved 10-inch. Here's a 16-inch record -- NRDGA-NAEA's "How to Prepare Better Newspaper Advertising" -- alongside a 12-inch, the ANPA Bureau of Advertising's "Newspapers Mean Business." The 16-inch record is too big to be played on a regular record player -- or, as a customer said recently at Mad World Records, a "vinyl machine."</span></p>

You're familiar with regular 12-inch LPs, 7-inch 45s and the hipsters' beloved 10-inch. Here's a 16-inch record -- NRDGA-NAEA's "How to Prepare Better Newspaper Advertising" -- alongside a 12-inch, the ANPA Bureau of Advertising's "Newspapers Mean Business." The 16-inch record is too big to be played on a regular record player -- or, as a customer said recently at Mad World Records, a "vinyl machine."

<p>Bill and Marion, are you out there? In 2014, features editor Lucinda Breeding was contacted by Jon Mauch of Cincinnati, who was seeking her help in locating a couple by those names in this town or somewhere else.&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">His letter says: "My parents were Bill &amp; Marion and as I worked on cleaning out their house, I came across these glasses with 'Bill and Marion' etched on the sides.</span></p><p>"I suspected that there would be another Bill &amp; Marion out there somewhere, and searched to find such a couple. As it turns out, there are very few and even fewer who have an address that I could use. Please accept these as a gift and I hope you will enjoy them. If you do not want them, I leave it up to you to find another Bill &amp; Marion who might!"</p><p></p><p><i>UPDATE: The Bill and Marion glasses found a home with Bill and Marion Graham, longtime exhibitors at the Denton Arts &amp; Jazz Festival. They were the longtime owners of&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 1em; background-color: transparent;">the Texas Pickup Cafe, a popular hangout on Prairie Street near the UNT campus until it was destroyed by fire in 2001.&nbsp;</span></i></p><p></p>

Bill and Marion, are you out there? In 2014, features editor Lucinda Breeding was contacted by Jon Mauch of Cincinnati, who was seeking her help in locating a couple by those names in this town or somewhere else. 

His letter says: "My parents were Bill & Marion and as I worked on cleaning out their house, I came across these glasses with 'Bill and Marion' etched on the sides.

"I suspected that there would be another Bill & Marion out there somewhere, and searched to find such a couple. As it turns out, there are very few and even fewer who have an address that I could use. Please accept these as a gift and I hope you will enjoy them. If you do not want them, I leave it up to you to find another Bill & Marion who might!"

UPDATE: The Bill and Marion glasses found a home with Bill and Marion Graham, longtime exhibitors at the Denton Arts & Jazz Festival. They were the longtime owners of the Texas Pickup Cafe, a popular hangout on Prairie Street near the UNT campus until it was destroyed by fire in 2001.