Movies

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THEATERS

 

Cinemark Denton 2825 Wind River Lane off I-35E. 940-535-2654. www.cinemark.com .

Movie Tavern 916 W. University Drive. 940-566-FILM (3456). www.movietavern.com .

Rave Cinemas 8380 S. I-35E, Hickory Creek. 940-321-2788. www.ravemotionpictures.com .

Silver Cinemas Inside Golden Triangle Mall, 2201 S. I-35E. 940-387-1957. www.silvercinemasinc.com .

 

OPENING FRIDAY

 

The Call A 911 operator who takes a call from an abducted teenager must confront a killer from her own past to save the girl’s life. With Halle Berry, Abigail Breslin and Morris Chestnut. Directed by Brad Anderson. Rated R, 98 minutes. — Los Angeles Times

The Power of Few Spies, cops, criminals and religious conspiracists cross paths over a mysterious smuggling operation. With Christopher Walken, Christian Slater and Anthony Anderson. Written and directed by Leone Marucci. Rated R, 93 minutes. — LAT

Spring Breakers (***) Harmony Korine seems to want it both ways, all day, in this super-stylized descent into a sun-baked hell where bikini-clad, gun-toting college babes serve as our guides. As writer and director, Korine wants us to be appalled and aroused, hypnotized and titillated. He wants to satirize the debauchery of girls gone wild while simultaneously reveling in it. And he pulls it off. The corruption of formerly squeaky-clean Disney superstars Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens may be Korine’s cleverest trick of all: They get to show some range, we get to gawk. But James Franco steals the whole movie away when he arrives about halfway through as a wanna-be gangster rapper named Alien. Rated R, 92 minutes. — AP

 

NOW PLAYING

 

Dark Skies As an escalating series of disturbing events torments a young suburban family, the husband and wife try to stop the mysterious force targeting them. With Keri Russell, Josh Hamilton, Dakota Goyo and Kadan Rockett. Written and directed by Scott Stewart. Rated PG-13, 97 minutes. — LAT

Dead Man Down (*1/2) Danish director Niels Arden Oplev makes his Hollywood debut, re-teaming with Noomi Rapace (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo) in this lifeless thriller about two lost souls bent on vengeance. Colin Farrell plays a brooding gangster, Victor, who’s infiltrated the brutal gang of Alphonse (a typically velvety Terrence Howard) to avenge the deaths of his wife and daughter. He’s joined in revenge by Beatrice (Rapace), who blackmails him into killing the drunken driver who crashed into her. Preposterous dialogue and haphazard plotting. Rated R, 118 minutes. — AP

Escape From Planet Earth In this animated film, a nerdy blue alien endeavors to rescue his brother, a famous astronaut, from the notoriously dangerous planet Earth. With the voices of Brendan Fraser, Sarah Jessica Parker, Jessica Alba and George Lopez. Rated PG, 89 minutes. — LAT

Identity Thief (**) Identity Thief strands ordinarily enjoyable comics Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman in the middle of nowhere with no help for miles. Bateman’s mild-mannered accounts processor, Sandy Patterson, discovers that a con artist (McCarthy) has stolen his identity and racked up thousands of dollars in charges. Sandy schleps to Florida to track down the perpetrator and drag her back to Denver to face charges. Rated R, 107 minutes. — AP

Jack the Giant Slayer (***1/2) A big-budget, 3-D retelling of the Jack and the Beanstalk legend may seem like the unlikeliest pairing yet of director Bryan Singer and writer Christopher McQuarrie (The Usual Suspects, Valkyrie), but this ends up being smart, thrilling and a whole lot of fun. It actually ends up being pleasingly old-fashioned. Shot in 3-D — rather than one of those muddled 2-D re-dos — the film looks crisp and clean. Nicholas Hoult, Eleanor Tomlinson, Stanley Tucci and Bill Nighy star. Rated PG-13, 117 minutes. — AP

The Last Exorcism Part II A young woman tries to start a new life after a harrowing ordeal, only to once again encounter a demonic presence. With Ashley Bell, Julia Garner and Spencer Treat Clark. Directed by Ed Gass-Donnelly. Rated PG-13, 88 minutes. — LAT

Oz the Great and Powerful (**1/2) This prequel aims for nostalgia in older viewers who grew up on The Wizard of Oz while simultaneously enchanting a newer, younger audience. It never really accomplishes either successfully. Director Sam Raimi also is trying to find balance between creating a big-budget, 3-D blockbuster and placing his stamp of kitschy, darkly humorous horror. The results are inconsistent. At its center is a miscast James Franco as the circus huckster who becomes the reluctant Wizard of Oz. Mila Kunis, Rachel Weisz and Michelle Williams play the three witches he meets. Rated PG, 130 minutes. — AP

Silver Linings Playbook (**) Writer-director David O. Russell takes Matthew Quick’s novel about a man (Bradley Cooper) with bipolar disorder who returns from a mental facility to live with his doting mother (Jacki Weaver) and his Philadelphia Eagles-obsessed father (Robert DeNiro). Add another unstable, seemingly unsuited love interest (Jennifer Lawrence) and the results are abrasive histrionics, much yelling and consistent inconsistency. Rated R, 122 minutes. — B.A.

Snitch When his teenage son is wrongfully accused of a drug-distribution crime, a desperate father cuts a deal with the U.S. attorney to infiltrate a drug cartel on a risky mission. With Dwayne Johnson, Susan Sarandon and Benjamin Bratt. Directed by Ric Roman Waugh. Rated PG-13, 112 minutes. — LAT

21 and Over When his two best friends pay him a surprise visit for his 21st birthday, a straight-A college student throws caution to the wind for a wild night, despite having an important medical school interview the next morning. With Miles Teller, Justin Chon and Skylar Astin. Rated R, 93 minutes. — LAT

Warm Bodies The latest permutation of the zombie screen phenomenon places heart over horror and romantic teen angst over sharp social commentary. The story’s dystopian versions of Romeo and Juliet are Nicholas Hoult’s R — he can’t remember his full name — and Teresa Palmer’s Julie, whose meet-cute involves a shoot-’em-up that ends badly for her boyfriend (Dave Franco). Writer-director Jonathan Levine (The Wackness, 50/50) works from Isaac Marion’s young-adult novel. For those open to the idea of a gently goofy mash-up, the film is strong on atmosphere and offers likably low-key, if somewhat bland, charms. Rated PG-13, 97 minutes. — The Hollywood Reporter


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