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Briefly in good living

Reducing food waste is good for Earth, wallets

Remember how it was when you were a kid sitting at the kitchen table and your mother served up a healthy helping of rutabagas? Gross, right?

You slipped them to the family dog or spooned them into a napkin. But there was no fooling Mom. Your failed sleight-of-hand resulted in membership in the Clean Your Plate Club.

Fast-forward to today and you’ll find that wasting food has costly consequences.

“Getting food from the farm to our fork eats up 10 percent of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50 percent of U.S. land and swallows 80 percent of all freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet 40 percent of food in the United States goes uneaten,” according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

 

Traverse City, Mich.

Listing of bumblebee as endangered delayed

The Trump administration on Thursday delayed what would be the first endangered designation for a bee species in the continental U.S., one day before it was to take effect.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service adopted a rule Jan. 11 extending federal protection to the rusty patched bumblebee, one of many bees that plays a vital role in pollinating crops and wild plants. It once was common across the East Coast and much of the Midwest, but its numbers have plummeted since the late 1990s.

Federal law requires a 30-day waiting period before most new regulations become effective. The addition of the bee to the endangered species list was scheduled for Friday.

— The Associated Press