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The Place is Argyle: Football moms are Argyle's biggest fans

Profile image for Lynn Sheffield Simmons
Lynn Sheffield Simmons

FNF (Friday Night Football) magazine is dedicated to high school football in Texas, Florida, Georgia, Ohio, North and South Carolina and has embarked on learning the schools that have the best collection of football team moms in the FNF states. One large school (1,000-plus students) and one small school from the six states were selected, through online voting.

The 2017 BUBBA Burger FNF Magazine Football Team Moms Contest winners are two schools in Texas — Allen High School and Argyle High School. Allen won the large school division and will receive $1,000, while Argyle was the winning small school and will receive $500.

Argyle ISD Superintendent Telena Wright stands between Argyle Town Manager Matt Jones, left, and Argyle Mayor Don Moser with the 2017 Class Lone Star Cup. The cup is awarded to schools in each classification that rack up the most points based on achievement in academics, sports and fine arts. Argyle won the 4A division for the sixth straight year and eighth time overall. It was presented to the school by the University Scholastic League during halftime of the Eagles' game against Wylie High School of Abilene on Sept. 22.Courtesy photo
Argyle ISD Superintendent Telena Wright stands between Argyle Town Manager Matt Jones, left, and Argyle Mayor Don Moser with the 2017 Class Lone Star Cup. The cup is awarded to schools in each classification that rack up the most points based on achievement in academics, sports and fine arts. Argyle won the 4A division for the sixth straight year and eighth time overall. It was presented to the school by the University Scholastic League during halftime of the Eagles' game against Wylie High School of Abilene on Sept. 22.
Courtesy photo

A photo of the team's moms and an article will appear in their respective edition of FNF magazine.

It's nice these dedicated moms are recognized. I remember going through the routine of carpooling, sitting in the bleachers during practices before the school year began writing Denton Record-Chronicle articles on a portable typewriter, taking football players to school when it began and picking them up after practice, along with attending all the games.

When I began the habit of attending every game, I was joined by two friends. As the crowd roared at kickoff, the three of us agreed our lives were frantic enough without becoming emotional over a game. We sat quietly through most of the first half until I interrupted the silence saying to one lady, "You look tired."

"Naw, I'm just sleeping with my eyes open," she replied, staring blankly at the field. "I believed in Planned Parenthood, so I got one on the pee wees, one on the eighth-grade team, and a high kicker who's an expert at ripping pantyhose and losing gloves. Hey, your kid just got decked."

"Where is he?" I gasped, my eyes searching the field.

"On the ground," answered the second lady.

"He's OK. He's walking off on his own steam," I said.

"Look, the band is coming on the field for halftime. One of you watch the trumpets, while I keep an eye on the drums."

"I'm watching the fancy steppers," informed the now alert mother. "Look at her — third from the end. Oh, the practice it took to do that!"

"Don't talk to me about practice. We couldn't go anywhere most of the summer," she said, trying to watch the drums and the trumpets.

Before long, she stood up: "I've lost the trumpets. Which way did they go?"

"They're heading back to the stands," I answered. "What a great show!"

"Thank you," they replied in unison, jumping up to applaud the team running back onto the field.

"Do you realize we are seven points ahead?" I squealed.

"Yep, TERRIFIC block!" she yelled, slapping me on the back.

"That's right, baby. Take 'em down," I shouted.

"Did you see that!" yelled the other lady, elbowing me in the ribs.

Throughout the rest of the game we clapped, jumped up and high-fived.

"Another touchdown!" we screamed, hugging each other.

As the crowd cheered our winning team, we nonchalantly left our seats and while walking out of the stadium my sleepy friend said, "Nice the team won."

"Yeah, back to the ole grind," answered the other.

"It never pays to get excited," I yawned. "Or we'd be uptight all season."

Organizations

Keep Argyle Beautiful will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in PointBank, 302 U.S. Highway 377. Keep Argyle Beautiful preserves and enhances the town's natural environment through visit educational and motivational programs and special events. For more information www.keepargylebeautiful.com, or email Deborah Cottle at dcottle@temporah.com.

The Argyle Lions Club meets at noon on the first Tuesday of every month at Coffee Tree Café, 144 Old Town Blvd. in Argyle, and at 6:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of the month following a board meeting at 5:30 p.m. in the Community Room at Argyle Town Hall, 308 Denton St. For more information, contact Deborah Cottle via email at dcottle@temporah.com

The Argyle Chamber of Commerce meets the third Tuesday of every month for breakfast from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Lantana Golf Club, 800 Golf Club Drive. The chamber office is in Point Bank, 302 U.S. Highway 377. For more information, visit www.argylechamber.org or call 940-464-9990.

The Argyle Senior Center meets every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Community Room at Argyle Town Hall, 308 Denton St. with exercise beginning at 10 a.m. followed by card games at 11 a.m. The ASC has a monthly luncheon on the third Friday of every month at noon. Those attending are asked to bring a side dish. Anyone age 55 and older is welcome to attend. For more information, call Stella at 940-464-7438 or Karen at 940-464-0506.

LYNN SHEFFIELD SIMMONS is the founder and past president of the North Texas Book Festival Inc. She is the author of 10 children's books and two history books on Argyle. Her website is www.argylebooks.com. She can be reached at lynn@argylebooks.com.