UNT briefs

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UNT among most sustainable universities

The University of North Texas has been ranked among the world’s most sustainable campuses in the third annual GreenMetric Ranking of World Universities, which is compiled by the University of Indonesia.

UNT is ranked second in Texas and 110th in the world. Universities from 49 countries were included in the rankings, and rankings were organized based on factors such as water usage, waste management and education.

The ranking emphasizes UNT’s commitment to being at the forefront of sustainability, and is the latest of many awards recognizing UNT’s commitment to being “green.” In 2012, UNT was recognized as “the best” by The North Texas Commission in its “Working for Clean Air” awards, as a Higher Education winner in the 2012 Green School Awards by the U.S. Green Building Council Central Texas — Balcones Chapter, and has been named a Green College by The Princeton Review two years in a row.

Some of UNT’s green efforts include the installation of six electric vehicle charging stations on campus; the installation of three wind turbines near Apogee Stadium; and the opening of four LEED-certified buildings, including UNT’s Business Leadership Building, Apogee Stadium, Life Sciences Complex, and UNT’s newest parking garage.

 

Researcher receives foundation grant

Gayatri Mehta, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of North Texas, has received a nearly $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to continue research on how human intuition can help engineers find ways to design smaller electronic devices that use less battery power.

Mehta and a group of researchers in the College of Engineering developed the computer game Untangled in early 2012. The game features a series of blocks inlaid on a graph and is open for the public to play. Players are asked to arrange the blocks more efficiently while adhering to certain constraints, which mimics the challenge of efficiently organizing components within electronic devices.

The game allows researchers to observe strategies for mapping that could be used to create new architectural designs for next-generation electronic devices.

Mehta and her team of researchers visually and mathematically analyze the game strategies of top scoring players. Their research will help to develop the next generation of cellphones, medical devices and other electronics.


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