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Back to School: How to help your child's teacher

Profile image for Lucinda Breeding
Lucinda Breeding

The school year is coming fast, and things will get busy soon. We asked local teachers and school staffers if there was anything they'd like parents to keep in mind. Here's what they had to say.

Crunch those numbers...

"I wish parents knew that with hard work, all students can improve their math skills. They need to know there is no math gene or innate ability to do math well." - Robin Elizabeth Zaruba, 7th grade math teacher, Crownover Middle School. 

Laura Koenig, (adult) pre-k teacher, is shown in 2015  teaching Myriah Love, (left to right) Jayden Murillo, Denise Alamilla and Edgar Sandate  how math a game works in class at Cesar Chavez Learning Center in Dallas.Staff Photographer
Laura Koenig, (adult) pre-k teacher, is shown in 2015  teaching Myriah Love, (left to right) Jayden Murillo, Denise Alamilla and Edgar Sandate how math a game works in class at Cesar Chavez Learning Center in Dallas.
Staff Photographer

But don't forget those letters...

"For every grade level, read together (same book or varied). Less screen time and more page time helps in all academic areas." - Beth Sullivan, former teacher, Denton ISD. 

"It's not too late to encourage your children to READ for the rest of the summer. Libraries are there for them. They will retain more of what they learned and it will make it so much easier for the teachers to teach and the students to learn." - Katherine Boyer, retired library director. 

Preparation is important...

"Remember that kids can't grow without the sleep they need. Please monitor your kids when you tell them to go to bed. Half of my students express to me that they stay up half the night playing video games." - Lisa Edwards Jones, reading intervention teacher, Evers Park Elementary School.

Several teachers told the <i>Denton Record-Chronicle </i>that their students copped to playing video games when they parents thought they were sleeping.&nbsp;TNS
Several teachers told the Denton Record-Chronicle that their students copped to playing video games when they parents thought they were sleeping. 
TNS

"When buying new school clothes have your primary child sit on the floor cross-cross. If you can see their bottom hanging out, so can everyone at school." - Britni Smith, elementary school teacher at Aubrey ISD. 

"School supplies are expensive, but teachers are buying them too, as many students cannot afford them in their classes. Also, these supplies do not last all year, so teachers are having to purchase the replenishments out of their own pocket, usually in January if not before. Teachers do understand if parents need to break up the purchases over several pay periods to make sure they get everything on the list." - Kali Beazley Wood, special education teacher, Crownover Middle School. 

Your anxiety can be contagious...

"Parents- try to be as positive about school as possible! Try to keep your stresses and fears and worries away because it transfers to your kids and turns in to fear and nerves for them! It will be a wonderful school year!" - Evelyn Y'Barbo, Lewisville ISD.

But if your children do get stressed, help them relax without gadgets or gizmos...

One local teacher pleads "please, no fidget spinners" when you pack your child's backpack.
Blue fidget spinner hobby device in white backgroundGetty Images/iStockphoto
One local teacher pleads "please, no fidget spinners" when you pack your child's backpack. Blue fidget spinner hobby device in white background
Getty Images/iStockphoto

"Please, DON'T send spinners! I've been teaching for 30 years and have seen many different gadgets over the years. It's always something, but they are a big distraction even at the high school level. Every time I go through a checkout somewhere I see buckets of them and cringe."  - Leigh Range, history teacher, Sanger High School

Mind the traffic...

"I'm not a teacher, but I am a school crossing guard. So, please be hyper vigilant in and around school zones! Protect our future!" - Alan Keeling, Argyle.