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Ellie Alonzo

Denton groups, artists nominated for Dallas music awards

Profile image for Lucinda Breeding
Lucinda Breeding

Denton bands, solo artists and personalities are among the nominees for the Dallas Observer Music Awards. A few nominees have ties to Denton, but are now based in Dallas, Fort Worth or surrounding cities. 

Denton band Pearl Earl picked up three nominations. The local band dropped its self-titled debut album earlier this year. The group was nominated for Best Album and picked up a nomination for Best Song with the track "Meet Your Maker." The band's drummer, Bailey Chapman, was among the nominees for Best Drummer. 

Another onetime Denton musician, Bobak Lotfipour, now in California, also earned a nomination for Best Drummer. 

The Texas Gentlemen consider the Denton music scene a tributary to the band's country rock. The band is nominated for Best Album for TX Jelly, Best Country Act, Best Group Act and front man Beau Bedford is nominated for Best Producer. 

Texas Gentlemen. 
Texas Gentlemen. 

Denton experimental act, Filth, is the brainchild of local DIY activist Rob Buttrum. Filth is nominated for Best Experimental/Noise Act. 

Denton band Levi Cobb & the Big Smoke, a folk rock  act that has been knocking around the Dallas-Fort Worth scene since 2010, was nominated for Best Folk Act. 

Two musicians who called Denton home before heading to Dallas landed nominations for Best Funk/R&B Act: Quentin Moore and M3CCA. 

M3CCA also earned a nomination for Best New Act. 

Michael J. Slack, a member of Denton's art rock trio Dome Dwellers, was nominated for Best Guitarist. 

UNT alumnus and neo-soul man Quentin Moore is nominated for a Dallas Observer Music Award for est Funk/R&B Act.Courtesy photo
UNT alumnus and neo-soul man Quentin Moore is nominated for a Dallas Observer Music Award for est Funk/R&B Act.
Courtesy photo

The Observer couldn't give an award for Best Jazz Act without tipping a hat toward University of North Texas — or shouldn't. And this year, alumna Ashleigh Smith is a member of the Mean Green with a nomination. The Thaddeus Ford Band, another nominee, has had UNT alumni in the group. Denton's Drew Phelps plays bass in nominated band Ataraxia Trio. Yells at Eels trumpet man, Dennis Gonzalez, has produced radio programs for the UNT radio station. 

Rowdy Denton punk band Jesus Chris and the Beetles is among the nominees for Best Live Act. 

Denton pianists almost swept nominations for Best Pianist/Keyboardist. Paul Slavens was nominated, as were the BoomBachs' Matt Westmoreland and Chad Stockslager, probably best known for his work with Slobberbone and its offshoot, The Drams. 

Def Rain, the electronic music persona of former Denton musician Ashley Cromeens (Record Hop), was nominated for Best Pop Act. 

UNT alumnus Donovan Payne saw his rap persona, 88 Killa, nominated for Best Rap/Hip Hop Act.

UNT alumnus 88 Killa, the hip-hop persona of Donovan Payne, is among the nominees for Best Rap/Hip Hop Act for the Dallas Observer Music Awards. Photo by JerSean Golatt.JerSean Golatt
UNT alumnus 88 Killa, the hip-hop persona of Donovan Payne, is among the nominees for Best Rap/Hip Hop Act for the Dallas Observer Music Awards. Photo by JerSean Golatt.
JerSean Golatt

Denton and Denton-adjacent radio personalities up for the Best Radio Show/Podcast: Paul Slavens for The Paul Slavens Show on KKXT 91.7 FM; UNT alumnus Mark Schectman of The Local Ticket, KCTK 96.7 FM; and Sonic Assembly, Reid Robinson and Mark Ridlen's show on Denton's brand new lo-fi FM station, KUZU. 

Hand Drawn Records might be an Addison company, but it was co-founded by UNT alumnus and musician Dustin Blocker. The record company, which spun off a vinyl pressing operation this year, is up for the award it's won before, Best Record Label. 

Downtown Denton shop Mad World Records is a nominee for Best Record Store. 

Denton artist Daniel Markham and local band Dome Dwellers are up for Best Rock Act.

The awards ceremony and concert will start at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 2 in a number of Deep Ellum venues. Music ends at 2 a.m. Dec. 3. The one-night event features more than 40 bands on nine stages in Deep Ellum. Tickets cost from $10 to $34. A complete ballot is available online.