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Al Key

Rainy day

Profile image for By Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe
By Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe
Water from heavy rains runs over the banks of a drainage culvert near the Denton State Supported Living Center on Mayhill Road on Friday in Denton.Al Key
Water from heavy rains runs over the banks of a drainage culvert near the Denton State Supported Living Center on Mayhill Road on Friday in Denton.
Al Key

Region soaks in rain

Summer wound down with a long, soaking rain that began after the sun set Thursday night.

By midday Friday, more than 1.18 inches of rain had fallen at Denton Enterprise Airport. Rain gauges around North Texas recorded a wide range of accumulations, from less than an inch in counties along the Red River to more than 5 inches in Navarro County. By the time the rain was expected to end, overnight Friday into Saturday, meteorologists expected another 1.5 to 2 inches of rain to fall.

An approaching cold front drew up moisture from two tropical systems that came ashore in Mexico at the same time, Ingrid from the Gulf of Mexico and Manuel from the eastern Pacific, according to Steve Fano, meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

“Unfortunately, it won’t be enough to fill the lakes,” Fano said. “But it’s good for foundations and soils, and that’s a plus.”

Much of Texas remains in severe drought, with portions of North and Central Texas in extreme drought, according to the latest maps with the U.S. Drought Monitor.

The cold front wasn’t moving as quickly toward the area as meteorologists thought, but after it moves through, the rain is expected to end overnight. Clouds may linger through the morning, but by midday, skies should clear and the weekend will bring drier air with a cool breeze, Fano said.

Highs are expected to reach 83 degrees today, and 85 degrees on Sunday, after an overnight low of 56 degrees today into Sunday.

While temperatures will begin warming again next week, another cool front is expected at the end of the week.

“We’re getting into a pattern more typical for this time of year, where weather systems are more frequent,” Fano said. “It doesn’t look nearly as hot.”

According to the Climate Prediction Center, the seasonal outlook for most of the North Texas Region shows normal temperatures and precipitation likely for the fall.

The autumn equinox comes Sunday at 4:44 p.m.