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Letters to the editor, April 21

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Denton Record-Chronicle Readers

Truth about science

On Saturday I will march to call attention to the truth about science, an organized system for exploring and understanding the world around us. The process seeks truth and to that end requires that new information be shared with others whether or not we like or are even comfortable with the outcome or results.

Science is the very foundation of justice. Opinion and bias have no place; government censoring of results is unequivocally destructive, reprehensible and cannot be tolerated.

Fellow scientists are expected to scrutinize the work of others and to use new knowledge not only as a bridge to future discoveries but as a means of more complete and accurate understanding of what we think we already know.

Supporting science is an obligation of society. Conversely, suppression or political manipulation of science halts our progress as a civilization. Standing idly by while politicians and governments defund or meddle in the scientific process invites calamity and is unthinkable as a society.

This is why I will march, on Saturday or any day.

Catherine Lustgarten,
Denton

Invest in future

Improving our nation's infrastructure is critical in the following ways.

1. Replacing radios with GPS technology in airport control towers will save fuel, money and time.

2. Developing better batteries will allow power companies to store and use more wind and solar energy.

3. Making our power grid safer from cyber attacks with a manual backup will make it more responsive to disruptions.

4. Fixing outmoded locks and dams on our rivers, especially where the Ohio River meets the Mississippi, will shorten transport times, lowering the cost of everything from bread to gas.

5. Providing the 25 percent of the nation that does not have it with internet access will help to close the deficit in education and opportunities.

6. Fixing our water and wastewater treatment systems will help to guarantee clean water.

7. Improving the cross-country rail bottleneck around Chicago will save time for commuters and money for companies.

8. Building climate-change defenses (such as sea walls) around our coastal cities will save lives and billions of dollars in damage.

9. Building more bridges where congestion is costly (such as, between Cincinnati and Covington, Kentucky) will be beneficial to our economy.

These projects are not expenses.

They are investments in the future of our nation.

Bob Michaelsen, 

Denton