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Letters to the editor, October 10

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Denton Record-Chronicle Readers

Blood of innocents

In 1937, 300 school children were killed in an accidental natural gas explosion that blew up their school in East Texas. The oil and gas industry said it was not the gas that killed the kids but the improper way it was piped into the building. Under pressure, the industry odorized the gas and changed other rules to make it safer to use.

Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded 500 more with a gun championed by the National Rifle Association.

Guns kill an estimated 30,000 people in the U.S. each year.

And the NRA calls for more guns, modifications that circumvent current anti-automatic weapon laws, legalization of armor-piercing bullets and easy access to silencers so one can kill at a distance, unheard and unknown.

At what point does the NRA have the blood of innocents on its hands? At what point do lawmakers (Burgess, Cruz, Cornyn) who vote against any type of gun regulation have blood on their hands?

The next time you watch the clouds turn blood red and the sky darken at sunset, think of the people killed by these assault rifles backed by the NRA, and the sorrow of the ones left behind.

Think of the congressmen who accept NRA money and vote to continue the killing in the name of "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" now no longer possible for so many.

Think of your children and those willing to perpetuate the killing for profit or re-election.

Bill Reed,
Denton

Addictive sense of power

Fifty-nine people dead; over 500 injured. Even in your worst nightmares, did you believe such an occurrence could materialize? Fifty nine people dead and more than 500 injured.

Did this horror melt the icy hearts and bulging pockets of the Washington political establishment? How heartrending that elected House and Senate members have declared this is not the time to publicly discuss gun control!

If the NRA has them in their money-lined pockets, there will be no political discussion of gun control.

While they wait for that mythical time, bump stocks that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire like fully automatic rifles are selling faster than Trump can commit another political faux pas.

After all the bloodletting in Las Vegas, why would a sane person pay triple the price that bump stocks have jumped to after their potential power was publicized with the eradication of innocent life.

Truth is the "gun nut" who will spare nothing to raise the cash to turn weapons in their collection into the equivalent of a submachine gun, may have a mental problem.

He does not intend to hunt deer, rabbits or squirrels with a fully automatic rifle.

They release their destructive power at gun ranges.

Perhaps you have a mental problem if the sound of guns popping, the smell of gunpowder in your nostrils and the recoil digging into your shoulder gives you an addictive sense of power, which in turn makes you feel more like a man.

John Nance Garner, 

Denton